2L Preparation: Preparing for my second year of law school

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Hello, World.

I am heading back to Virginia to begin my 2L year. While I’m sad to be leaving California, I am excited to get back to law school and my academic-year routine. I’ve thoroughly enjoyed my summer job and have learned an immense amount (mostly on the fly!). As 2L approaches, I wanted to share what I’m doing to prepare for my second year of law school. I’ve heard from many people that while 1L is the hardest, 2L is still difficult but in different ways. For example, if you serve on a journal you have an extra commitment that is time-consuming and important. I don’t want to be stressed this semester (or at least not really stressed) so I would like to prepare as much as possible.

This semester I am taking Federal Income Taxation, Evidence, Business Associations, and Mergers and Acquisitions. I am also on the William and Mary Business Law Review. This semester feels very full because all of my classes are relatively new information. I’m a bit nervous about the quantity of new information, but I think the key is studying consistently with weekly review sessions. I personally find figuring out how all the parts of a course work together is the key to succeeding in the course. In Torts, my professor would constantly say “it’s a seamless web, see?” And I would think, ‘no, I don’t.’ However, the more review I did and the more I studied for the final, the more I saw he was actually correct. While I don’t encourage outlining super early or trying to “study” for the final from day one, I do think reviewing new material at the end of each week makes studying at the end of the semester much more seamless. You will have already built a strong foundation from which to study!

So, to prepare for my classes, I’m setting the goal of spending Friday mornings reviewing the previous four days of material. I am also going to buy the Acing supplement series for Federal Income Tax, Evidence and Business Associations. I may end up buying for Mergers and Acquisitions, too, but we will see. One of my close law school friends showed me the Acing series and so I got the Property course book. It was a game changer! Honestly, I had an older professor who has taught property for a long time and didn’t take a ton of questions. The course was designed to mainly learn on your own. The Acing Property book saved me and I ended up with a fairly high grade in the course. I also found this supplement easy to follow and I appreciate that it is designed with test taking in mind. It doesn’t just tell you the information, but rather it shows you exactly how to approach a problem once you spot it in a fact pattern.

Additionally, I am hoping to get back into a regular workout routine. Being home this summer I haven’t worked out as much as I would have liked. I was really into working out last spring, but then I came home and started working and just couldn’t figure out a time to make workouts happen. I’m definitely putting my health first this semester, though. This means I will work out regularly and I’m hoping to eat healthier (one too many cookies have been consumed this summer). I miss the way I ate in college – greens, protein, and more greens!

Another way in which I am preparing for 2L is by trying to lay a lot of the groundwork for my 2L summer job search while I’m not in school and while I’m home in California. I’m hoping to return to California (but I cannot control the job market), so I am trying to send out apps and network while in the state. I’m hoping the more work I do now, the sooner I can figure out what my 2L summer job will be and then I can check a major item off my ever-growing to do list.

The final big preparation I’m doing is spending time with my family. There is a huge possibility I won’t see my family again until December. Last fall I really struggled with not seeing them and homesickness. This year, I’m putting all my energy into focusing on wellness and classes. I want to make sure I’m physically and mentally healthy. I also want to make sure I’m excelling in my courses! I never quite thought I’d say it, but I’m excited to get back Williamsburg. I think that’s just a testament to the friend group I’ve developed there, though! I’m looking forward to a good semester with my two roommates, one of my good friends (who was a former RA, obviously), my wonderful Texan friend, and all the other people who make Williamsburg feel like home!

Though I’m naturally a little nervous about my second year of law school, spring semester of 1L went so much more smoothly than the first and I feel ready to tackle my courses. I also finally feel like I mastered the best study habits for myself and that really grew my confidence as a law student.

What are you doing to prepare for the upcoming year?

Truly,

Callie leigh

 

What I Wish I Knew Before Law School

What I Wish I Knew Before Law School

Hello, World.

By now you’re probably well acquainted with the phrase “hindsight is 20/20.” I recently chatted with a co-worker, and he asked me if I was gearing up to return to law school. I made the joke I should be but wasn’t quite on the “I’m ready to go” train yet. He laughed and said he missed school, but then said, “maybe it’s our nature, but as humans, we tend to remember experiences much fonder than they actually are.” I laughed and returned to stapling my copies of client documents. However, in the time between that conversation and now, as I write this, I cannot help but think he’s right. I sort of loathed one of my previous jobs, but after ending my time in that position and having a little distance from it, I realized it was the best job I’ve had and it was a huge learning experience. I’ve had this experience of being totally unsure about something, almost to the point of dislike, the whole time the thing is happening, but then I love it by the end.

The experience is like reading a book that has a very slow middle. The beginning gets you interested and grabs your attention enough to keep going, but the middle has you doubting whether you’re using your time effectively, then suddenly the end delivers and you’re so happy you stuck it out! Well, my first year of law school followed this same trajectory. You can read all about my 1L experience here. As a blogger, the questions I get emailed about the most often are how to prepare for law school. How to prepare for law school is a hard question to answer sometimes because everyone is different. Some people adjust so well to law school and some people (myself included) find it excruciating at first.

I am here to offer my advice by exploring aspects of law school I didn’t expect. I want to look at law school somewhat candidly and explain what I wish I would have known. I will say, I don’t think knowing any of the things I plan to discuss would have changed my mind about law school, but it would have eased my transition from undergrad to law school.

ONE || You’re surrounded by the best and the brightest. Law school attracts type A people, so be warned that you will be surrounded by a lot of people who have been hard workers and highly successful for most of their academic career. Therefore, because you are no longer the smartest or most hardworking in the room, things can get competitive. I picked a school that I didn’t perceive as very competitive. Everyone seemed friendly and I felt like it would be a great place to learn the law. My school remains mostly non-competitive, but just remember most law students are a little competitive by nature, so the competition rears its ugly head in various ways, and doesn’t’ always come in the form of academic competition.

TWO || It’s okay to study alone. I spent the first semester of law school buying into the idea of a study group. Study groups work for some people, but they don’t really work for me. I prefer to learn on my own then review with people. I don’t ever rely on others to learn information then teach it to me. I have friends who did study groups and loved them, but it’s completely okay if this method of study doesn’t work for you!

THREE || Some people are rude. This is by no means law school specific and I’m not implying I was ignorant to this fact before law school. However, I think I assumed (I know, bad idea) that by the time people got to law school they would be nice or at least have the grace to be kind. Stress can turn some people into different versions of themselves, and sometimes that means they become a little mean. If you’re new to law school and you notice someone being rude for no reason or they make you feel uncomfortable, unhappy, or inferior, just go ahead and run in the other direction. You don’t have to be friends with everyone. Treat people with respect, much of law school is working to build a professional network, but if you know someone isn’t your cup of tea, spend minimal time with them. One of the toughest adjustments for me in law school was how polite, but not friendly people were. Yes, everyone was polite, but Californians are pretty friendly people so I wasn’t used to people coming off as regularly uncaring or disinterested.

FOUR || Law School habits vary and it’s unclear which are good and which are bad. I used to have a bad mentality about school. I thought I knew how to do things best, and if someone had a different way of studying, they weren’t going to do as well as me. This mentality ended in high school, but it still astounds me how many people don’t have to study or work hard and still excel. I’m someone who always has to spend a few extra hours studying something. Once I “get it,” it’s committed to memory and I won’t have to re-learn it, but the learning process hasn’t been something I’ve just floated through. You may be tempted to get annoyed by people who you feel aren’t studying enough, but just know everyone works a little differently and it’s not your concern.

FIVE || You’ll probably feel unsure more than you feel sure. Very few students feel sure all the time. Maybe the top 10%-ers feel like they have a firm grasp on law school, but most students feel tired, unsure, and laugh at the utter misery that is law school. Now, when I say misery I don’t mean law school is miserable. Yes, it’s hard. Yes, it’s tiring. Yes, it’s a lot of work. However, most law students bond in the sort of amped up agony we endure in a semester. When you’re walking to class and groaning about the huge cup of coffee you need or how complicated a case was or how tedious a writing exercise felt. Law school is hard but part of the bonding experience is bonding over how hard law school is.

SIX || Forming strong relationships with professors may require work. This may vary based on law school, but at my law school we have blind grading, which means how much you participate in class won’t affect your final grade. The blind grading aspect allows many students to fall victim to the social media browsing in class or falling behind on the reading. While cold calling is still a factor, most students only participate when they are called on. If you raise your hand a bunch, you risk being deemed a gunner. It’s really a lose lose. However, there are ways to build relationships with professors out of class. If your professor offers semester lunches, sign up for one! If you have questions, go to the professor’s office hours. Seek your professor out outside of the classroom. I think becoming a person, and not just another face on the seating chart is the best way to ensure you’re building rapport with the professor.

Okay, I could give even more items of things I wish I had known, but I think I covered the areas I was most surprised by in law school. I expected cold calling, I expected it to be hard, and I expected to meet people I really liked. While you cannot anticipate every curve ball law school will throw your way, I hope the areas I covered will offer a bit of insight into what’s coming.

Truly,
Callie leigh

Law School Pedigree

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Hello, World.

I remember when I used to spend hours pouring over books about various colleges. Then when it came time to apply to law school, I spent an embarrassing amount of time researching law schools. A large part of looking at schools was trying to find the place that was the best fit. After all my research, I landed on the right school and started there in the fall. However, when the new law school rankings were leaked, and my school dropped a few spots, you’d have thought a war began with how much buzz and administrative attention the new number received. I couldn’t help but think, ‘Is this really that big of a deal?’ But at the end of the day, law school rankings exist and they seem to matter to some people. However, I asked Camille of the Tumblr blog Lawyering in Lilly to write about law school rankings after I realized she decided to keep her law school private because she was receiving hateful messages regarding her law school. She’s written for Bottled Creativity before here. Below are her thoughts on rankings.


Law school pedigree. If you’re a law student or are planning on embarking on the law school journey, you’ve probably heard the term. Is it really true that where you go to law school determines your future rate of success or that going to a lower ranked law school isn’t worth your time? I suppose that depends on who you ask, but as a third-year law student at a lower ranked school, I would say that that couldn’t be further from the truth.

While there is no doubt that higher ranked schools have their reputation for a reason, an education from a lower ranked school can be equally as fulfilling. One important note about legal education is that it is widely the same across the country. Most students finishing their first year of law school will have a similar experience, whether they attend Harvard or Yale, or a school with a less reputable title. They will likely all have taken the same courses – Torts, Property, Civil Procedure, Contracts, and Criminal Law (with some exceptions, as some schools choose to teach Constitutional Law during the first year instead). They will likely all have a war story to tell about a cold-call session gone wrong. They will all likely be able to recall several sleepless nights before a major legal writing assignment was due, or the clammy palms and cold sweat before their first oral argument. They will all likely know what it feels like to venture into the unknown, to study for finals not knowing what to expect, and to drastically change the way they think about life.

Attending a higher ranked school comes with a great deal of opportunities and an inherent reputation. For big law positions, law students attending lesser-known schools might be glossed over, their resume tossed aside in favor of one with a GW, Columbia, NYU, or Stanford label. Working hard at a top 25 law school could mean that the world is your oyster upon graduation.

But there are benefits to attending a lesser-known, lower-ranked school – a less competitive atmosphere and more opportunities to do well being two benefits that I have found. I am first to admit that while graduating college with honors and multiple degrees, scoring decently on the LSAT, and having a well-rounded resume, I don’t think I would be as successful at a top school as I am at my own school. I have had opportunities to become a member of the Law Review Executive Board, the Moot Court Board, and have my writing published, things that probably would not have been possible at a school that is much more competitive.

More importantly, I found myself to be better prepared for my summer position than my other peers who attend a more well-known school. While I had experience writing motions thanks to my first and second-year legal writing courses, my peers had only written memos. I also learned that, while I would spend my third year working out in the field through my school’s externship program, my peers would be responsible for getting into the trenches and finding their own externship, leaving many with little to no practical experience upon graduation. My point is not to brag or put myself above my other brilliant legal colleagues, but to gently remind those who may feel defeated that the grass is not always greener.

Not everyone is able to score in the 170’s on the LSAT, or graduate college in the top 5% of their class, or afford a top 25 law school education. It is important for those who cannot to know that it is certainly still worth going to law school. It is a rewarding experience that will open many doors for you, that will teach you the value of hard work, that will place you among some of the most wonderful people you will ever meet. At the end of the day (or, more accurately, three long years), you will still hold a piece of paper with “juris doctor” imprinted on it. You will still be an attorney, no matter where you chose to go to law school.


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Thank you, Camille! I think her thoughts are great, and I appreciate her reassurance that if you pick a school because you feel it’s the best fit for you, and not because of its pedigree, you’ll thrive. Don’t pick something that isn’t right just because you think its name will bring you more ease in finding a job. Finding a job is important, but so is being happy and loving where you are!

Truly,

Callie leigh

Collecting Qs

Hello, World.

In August I plan to do a Question & Answer post series. I’m answering all questions relating to college and law school! Now, this can mean a lot of things. You don’t have to ask me just about school or classes. Lifestyle questions are ok too! If you want to hear about making friends, eating healthy, or where the best coffee is (and how to know), those are all great questions as well.

Please asks your questions through this Google Form or by commenting below!
Truly,
Callie leigh

Stylish Academic’s Guide to Doing It All

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Hello, World.

I was having a conversation with an alumnus of my law school last weekend, and he mentioned that law associates who come in guns blazing, who charge the highest amount and work all hours of the week won’t [usually] last a year at his firm. Then he mentioned that it’s the same for law school – some students go in so hot that by the second semester, they cannot hang anymore. So, why is burnout such a real problem among young professionals and how do we prevent being one of the shooting stars (this is a How to Get Away With Murder reference, which if you aren’t watching, I recommend you start! So wickedly entertaining)? Well, a lot of not burning out is pacing yourself and preparing properly.

I watched a fellow law student my 1L year constantly stay up until the wee hours of the morning, only to get up early to be able to commute to school. This person worked constantly, rarely taking breaks and sort of overworking himself past the point of efficient studying. There were a few times I watched him fall asleep in class. I mean, if you’re sleeping through lecture, you cannot possibly be helping yourself. Also, if I noticed, there is a high probability the professor noticed considering we sat in the second row. At the time, I just kept feeling like that lifestyle just wasn’t sustainable. When I had my first day of property second semester, my professor, an older man who’s been teaching for years, said something about how last semester was over and the people who did well may do worse and the people who didn’t do well may do better.

Well, burnout was real, and a lot of those people who burned the midnight oil in the library looked so tired and worn out. A similar burnout occurs during finals. People don’t pace themselves, and by their last exam, their fingers flutter over their keyboard at a lag and their eyes don’t stay open without effort. Doing it all can be exhausting, but it doesn’t have to be. There are smart strategies for getting it all done without suffering from complete burnout. So, today I want to offer my guide to getting it all done and remaining intact in the process.

Going back to How to Get Away With Murder for a moment, the law students who are referred to as the “Keating five” seem to be doing it all. They seem to be the top of their class, assisting their professor in criminal case trials, having a personal life, and covering up murders. I mean, the five stars are busy people. One of the interesting things about TV that we all know? It’s scripted and only shows us the highlights. We obviously don’t need twenty minutes of footage where the law students are studying in the library. The fact they study is implied by their status as a law student. However, there could be twenty minutes of footage of someone studying or someone working and it wouldn’t be inaccurate, just boring. Still, those boring moments contribute to the person’s outward success (if the students don’t study, their grades suffer, and ultimately they may lose their status as one of the chosen criminal law students). The boring moments are part of the “doing it all.” The reason we don’t focus on them, however, is because we focus on people’s major moments even though we are well aware that there’s much more that goes into that moment.

ONE || Find something that releases stress. The quickest way to get it all done without killing yourself is having something that you love that doesn’t cause stress. In fact, it shouldn’t be a neutral activity, but an activity that actively releases your stress. If you do not have something that releases your stress, you’ll be too stressed out to get everything done well. Remember, a lot of people get everything done, but they cut corners and don’t always get it all done properly.

TWO || Stay aware of your limits. Become familiar with any limits you have, and stay aware of them. If you know you are not someone who can work on Sunday nights, build a schedule that excludes Sunday night working. If you know you’re not someone who works well with a certain personality type, figure out ways in which working with that personality becomes easier (or figure a way to work with them less). Knowing your limits allows you to better play to your strengths.

THREE || Do what makes you happy. This may seem like an odd tip, but I feel like doing it all doesn’t really mean anything if you aren’t doing what you love. It’s a lot easier to stay vigilant and motivated if you love what you do. If you don’t love what you do, chances are every step on your career road will feel like you’re weighted down.

FOUR || Be selective. You can do it all, but when I say all I mean you can do everything you want to do. If you don’t want to do something, you are wasting precious time. When I was in college, my friend proposed that I try to be Co-Editor-in-Chief with her for the school newspaper. I thought initially, yeah, that’d be a good resume builder. However, after more thought, I realized it wasn’t something I necessarily wanted to do and I knew my efforts would be better spent on the things I loved. So, be selective in what you want to do, then do it all!

FIVE || Stay organized. When you’re trying to do too many things at once, chances are something slips through the cracks. So, make sure you have a well-established system of staying on top of your tasks and commitments. For me, I make to-do lists. Loads of to-do lists. To-do lists help me track what needs to get done when. I put them in order of highest priority to lowest priority. I also have a section of things I should get done if I have a really productive day and finish my to-list early.

My final tip is this: doing it all is about preparation. You can do it all, but you want to be sure you’re prepared for what’s coming and that you remain in control of your schedule. If you become overwhelmed, you’ll probably start to let things slide, and your work product is diminished. Stay on top of your life and make strategic moves in your career. Look at things with the big picture in mind (aka do NOT get bogged down in too many details, but don’t lose sight of making sure the details are right). Life is about balance. If you are unbalanced, you cannot succeed because you will not know how to handle a heavier workload, a moved-up timeline, etc. Doing a lot of preparation on the front end will make the end result much better (and far more stress-free).

How do you do it all?

Truly,
Callie leigh

Are the Bad Boy and the Bad Friend Really Different?

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Hello, World.

I was in the fourth grade the first time I was friends with someone who consistently hurt my feelings. This may not seem unusual, I mean fourth graders can be pretty rude little creatures. The thought of my precious niece having to deal with “mean girls” in elementary and middle school makes me physically sick. I dealt with mean girls from a pretty young age. I used to think something was wrong with me. I used to think it was always my fault that something was going wrong with friends. Then I realized that kids change their opinions on literally everything so frequently, it’s hard to know if changing their mind about friendship is personal or not. However, when you’re a fourth grade girl who hangs out with her best friend one night after school, getting stomach cramps from laughing so hard, only to walk into class the next day and have her glare at you and ignore every attempt to talk to her, it’s hard to see that behavior as anything but personal.

Fourth grade and my twenties aren’t that different when it comes to friendships in all honesty. People say romantic relationships are riskier than friendships… I disagree. I personally invest far more of myself into a friendship than I do a relationship. Maybe this will change, but when I make friends, I want to be friends with the person for a long time. Also, I think it’s easier to feel less afraid of a friend hurting you than a potential suitor. How many of us go into friendships with the same guards up as we do when we’re dating someone new? We aren’t as guarded because we haven’t necessarily been scorned the same way by our friends. Sure, friends have falling outs as the years go by, but friends drifting apart is natural. It’s something that people typically don’t bat an eye at in life. Oh, you grew apart from so and so? Ms. Whatshername stopped calling after moving to a new place? That’s just part of life! I once wrote an open letter to the friends I’d fallen out of touch with, and I think falling out of touch is healthy sometimes and it really is normal. As frustrating as it can be, sometimes life just takes people different places and you’re no longer speaking the same language.

However, sometimes we don’t drift apart from people, even when we should. Some friendships seem great on the surface but are actually terrible for us. Why is it that we can recognize a bad boy a mile away, and know immediately the boy is bad for us, but when a bad friend is staring us down, we pretend like the boy and the friend are not made of the same cloth? We’ve grown up hearing about the exception to the rule in men. The Mr. Darcy versus the Mr. Mayer. There is a nice guy out there, just waiting to be found. Yet we don’t have the same scrutiny when it comes to friends. We accept friends like free samples handed out in the mall. We meet new people, find a common interest and bam! We’re friends. There’s so much less fear, no endless moments of thinking, “am I doing this right?” I’ve had a lot of unhealthy friendships in my life. In fact, those mornings in fourth grade made me scared that I was going to walk up to my friends one day and have them not like me, partly because the pattern that started in fourth grade was repeated in eighth grade and sophomore year of high school, until one day I decided to just stop trying to be friends with people who couldn’t decide if I was worthy of their friendship. If they couldn’t decide, they didn’t deserve my friendship. However, when I got to college, I encountered a group of people who were constantly rude to me for no apparent reason. My fourth-grade insecurities came to a head, and I ended up ugly crying in my towel to a friend. That’s when I made the decision final: if someone was going to treat me with the same amount of concern they would treat gum stuck to the bottom of their shoe, they didn’t need to be my friend.

Toxic friendships are hard to spot. They come in all different forms, some friends are passive aggressive, some are aggressive, some are so hot and cold the constant fluctuations give you whiplash. The first time I saw a toxic friendship play out in a big way was in the movie Something Borrowed (book and movie). Ironically, my oldest friend and I joke that we are similar to Darcy and Rachel, but not because of the toxicity of their friendship. We’re just opposites who happen to be best friends [the similarities stop there, though. Trust me.]. Anyway, Darcy and Rachel seem to be best friends on the surface, but the deeper you dig, the more you realize the friendship is incredibly draining and Darcy is consistently acting in such a way as to belittle Rachel. Though they seem like such great friends, the friendship is killing Rachel. No friend should belittle you. I had a law school friend who I talked to a ton first semester but took a step back from the second semester. The perception of myself as a law student, without their influence, was a stark contrast. I no longer felt like I was doing something wrong for not getting something immediately. I don’t want to go too far into it, but let’s just say I realized, with some distance between us, that their small comments were actually contributing heavily to my self-doubt and feelings of incompetence.

I’d like to conclude with this: you may not recognize a bad friend with the immediacy you would recognize a bad boy, but you should develop enough confidence in yourself to know that if someone is making you feel less than or inadequate or like they’re doing you a favor by being your friend, you’re most likely better without them.

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Have you ever had a toxic friend? How did you know? What did you do to change the situation?

Truly,
Callie leigh

A Day In My Life

Hello, World.

I thought it would be interesting if I shared what a typical day in my life is like. I get a lot of questions about law school, and what it really looks like. I know a lot of people watch movies about it or have heard the horror stories, but I think its hard to know what law school is actually like until you’re in it. I will also give a general disclaimer – law school can vary based on school, location, and personality type. All students handle law school a little differently. While this is my “daily life” as a law student, it looks different than both my roommates and most of my friends. We all have (slightly or very) different routine. I don’t really think there’s a best way to law school. As long as you are doing well, you’re doing something right.

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So, let’s dive into my day:

Anywhere from 6:00 am – 8:00 am: Wake up.

I realize this is  a large range. I will say I usually get up around 7:15, but some days I get up a bit early to do reading and other days I sleep in a bit later if I need to. I will often wake up at 7-ish, and lay in bed, checking my email, looking at Instagram, and reading the Skimm.

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7:45 am or 8:00 am to 8:45 am: Shower, get dressed, do makeup and hair, make bed.

This also probably seems like a while. While I get ready, I often watch Youtube videos, listen to makeup, make a to do list for the day.

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8:45 am – 9:30 am: take final notes, plan my day, and eat breakfast.

I listen to music, eat my breakfast (usually avocado toast, sometimes oatmeal with banana), and fill out important things in my calendar. I also double check my calendar, and update it if needed.

9:30 am – 10:00 am: go to law school for class.

I try to leave the house at a similar time each day, and everyday my first class is at 10:00 am. The rest of my can vary a LOT, depending on what classes I have that day. I tried to pick the schedule that tends to be most consistent, though.

10:00 am – 12:45 pm: Classes.

On Wednesdays I have my writing class and Constitutional law in the morning.

12:50 pm – 1:50 pm: Lunch Hour

William and Mary Law doesn’t have classes during this hour, so there are a lot of lunch meetings. Sometimes I will go see speakers, sometimes I will get work done in the cafe, and sometimes I will run off campus to get a coffee and lunch. My lunch hour tends to vary.

2:00 pm – 3:15 pm: Class

In the afternoon, I have property. Last semester I had torts at this time. I’m not a huge fan of afternoon classes, but unfortunately they are very common in law school.

3:30 pm – 5:00 pm: change, go to gym.

I usually spend a good portion of the afternoon getting in a good workout. I bike and use the elliptical most days. Some days I do squats, lunges, crunches, etc. I try to mix up my routine everyday because I get bored when I do the same sequence.

5:15 pm – 6:30 pm: cook dinner, eat, do some email management while I eat or watch Gilmore Girls (or whatever else I feel like watching).

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6:30 pm – 7:45 pm: read/do work.

This time is usually spent reading for my classes, outlining if its later in the semester, or working on a memo for my writing class.

7:45 pm- 8:00 pm: get snack/dessert.

Usually lactose free cookies and cream ice cream or popcorn.

8:00 pm – 9:30 pm: read/do work

See above!

9:30 pm – 11:00 pm: call home, watch Netflix, browse social media.

At the end of a long day, I light candles in my room, get into bed, and will usually begin winding down by calling my family. I talk to them for a bit, then watch Netflix while browsing social media (usually Instagram).

11:05 pm: lights out.

There you have it! I tend to try to stay pretty consistent, so even if my days don’t look exactly alike, my weeks are all pretty similar. I have a slightly altered routine for each day, depending on course schedule and meetings.

I hope this was interesting!

Truly,

Callie leigh

Saying No to Self-Doubt

Hello, World.

Today I want to share a post about self-doubt. But rather than lament that 90%, probably more, of the population experiences self-doubt regularly, I think it’s important to figure out ways to close the door on self-doubt. Figure out how to say, “no thank you!” or “ain’t nobody got time for that,” to self doubt! We all experience moments where we question our ability, and I think a lot of it has to do with feeling uncertain about the future. It’s not necessarily that we can’t do something, we just wonder if we’re doing the right thing.

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I have four main ways I combat self-doubt that I usually turn to when I’m starting to question myself, and even in the worst moments, at least one of my methods calms me.

  1. Meditate. Meditation is underrated. I think even if this doesn’t immediately wipe away uncertainty, it at least calms the mind, and you can use meditation to focus on the good things in your life, what your strengths are, and even meditate on why you’re feeling insecure.
  2. Call in the Big Guns (support system, whoever is on the list.) I usually go Mom-Dad-Sister, depending on why I need to call. Sometimes I go Dad first, if it’s a school related stress, and Mom first if it’s a social thing. If I really need to break down, Mom is always first. If none of them are available or I’m still feeling meh, I text my two college friends, who I have a group chat with. They’re always quick to give a pep talk and ground me.
  3. Take a Walk. This could also be a trip to the gym, but I know some days when I’m feeling extra down and I don’t have time to hit the gym, a walk downtown or across campus will calm me down. Fresh air is good for the soul, especially when you aren’t sure you’re in the right place doing the right thing. In those moments, get some fresh air, calm yourself, and remember why you started.
  4. Write it out. Sometimes I will journal when I need to just let out whatever is holding me back. I use a pen, and literally write away the self-doubt. The self-doubt goes onto a piece of paper, and then into the trash (recycling bin). Other days I will write “you are good enough,” or “build your empire,” on a little post it and put it in front of me on my desk or in my planner. That way, even when I’m questioning myself, I’m also encouraging myself!

While each of these steps may seem like they’re not actually that helpful, I can assure you, they are more helpful than you would think. Sometimes calling on someone is best, other times spending a little time on your mental health is best. Other times, getting outside and gaining perspective is needed. And other times, you just have to make self-doubt a tangible item that can be discarded! Whatever you need, each of these offers something a bit different in combating self-doubt!

What’s your favorite way to get rid of self-doubt?

Truly,
Callie leigh

Academic Lanes: Stop Comparing

Hello, World.

I’ve wanted to write this post for a while now, but I think I wasn’t sure how to articulate what I really wanted to say about academia in relation to others. Academics are often portrayed as pretty individual, but in reality, academics can be just as competitive and troublesome as the olympic trials (okay, maybe not that competitive, but you get my point). Academics are a battle of the brains, a battle of stamina, and a battle of who can put in the most (or the least) amount of work, and manage to come out on top.

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We live in a world where having a work ethic is ridiculed, and it is somehow cool to put in less work and get a high grade. “Oh, that A I got? I wrote the paper in 20 minutes.” “I only studied for an hour for that exam the morning of, and got a 98.” And those people putting in 110%? They’re overachievers, they’re try-hards, they’re “teacher’s pets.” Why do we care so much about how much or little other people are doing? Rather than focusing on everyone else’s academic journey, I think it’s important we focus on ourselves. Making sure our routine is working for us, making sure we’re making time for mental health, for physical health, and for our general well-being.

Now that I’m in law school, the tendency to compare is so much more prominent than it’s ever been in my life. I hear people comparing notes, subtly mentioning grades, likely hoping someone will say they did worse. I also hear people shaming those who have different study habits. And the people who study, essentially, 24-7 are called annoying, gunners, and,  once again, overachievers. Now, I understand that a HUGE part of comparison derives from the curve situation. All of law school is on a curve, so no matter how great you feel you’re doing, what matters more is how everyone else did in relation to you. So, it’s natural to compare yourself, trying to see where you stand on what feels like an arbitrary line.

But similar to sayings like “keep my name out your mouth,” I kind of feel like we, the academics, need a phrase like “stay in your own academic lane, mine’s occupied.” I think friendly competition is healthy in some contexts, but I would like to see more academics striving to be the best academic they can be, without so much focus on what everyone else is doing. You want to be the best? Okay, do your strategy, and if you’re the best, that’ll be obvious. But if you being the best involves constantly ridiculing other people, you’re not the best. Or you are, but you’re an insecure version of the best. Here’s the thing… the more we criticize other people, but worse we look. It’s actually a lot more amazing when the humble people succeed. Actually, not even the humble people, but the people who just do their own thing, without having to measure up against everyone.

I don’t want to make this post too rant-y, but I will conclude by saying that it’s important to stay in your own academic lane. All academics work differently, think differently, and practice different habits, which is GOOD because that’s why academics are interesting. We can all bring a slightly different perspective or point of view. Revel in the difference.

Truly,
Callie leigh

Finding Study Inspiration

Hello, World.

As we get further into the semester, it feels like we’re already in the trenches, even though it also feels like we just got drafted. So, I wanted to share my top five tips for getting study inspiration on the days that you aren’t necessarily feeling studying, but have to anyway.

Some days, I am extremely focused from the minute I get up, and other days I just can’t quite dedicate myself as effortlessly (even though I will get the work done). I’m sure I’m not the only person who has “off” days in terms of focus because we aren’t robots. If you do have the constant drive and focus though, props to you!

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I was talking about this post with my roommates and used the term “studyspo” and they were both confused. Apparently that’s not used outside of a hashtag, but whatever I’m going to pull a Gretchen Wieners and try to make it happen. So, when you need some study inspiration studyspo, look to the five places I’m going to share with you.

  1. TUMBLR. I follow SO many student tumblrs and they share so many study photos, which immediately makes me want to be productive. Some of my favorite blogs are Lawyering in Lilly, Law School in Lilly, and Study Spaces.
  2. #studyspo. In Instagram, when I need a little inspiration or motivation, I search the hashtag studyspo, and this will usually inspire me after a few minutes of scrolling.
  3. Make a To-Do List. Sometimes my lack of motivation is coming from being unsure where to start because I have a lot on my plate. Making a to do list puts everything visually in front of me, and I can prioritize what I need to get done when.
  4. Get Outside. Feeling restless can sometimes be fixed by listening to yourself, and getting away from your desk for a bit. Whether it’s a walk around the block, a trip to the gym, a fifteen minute meditation, listening to your restlessness, rather than fighting it, can often restore focus.
  5. Make some tea, eat a chocolate, inhale deeply. Some days I have trouble getting focused, and the first four attempts to get focused have failed me already. At this point, I make a cup of my favorite tea, eat a piece of chocolate, and inhale. Then I put my nose to the ground, and pump out an hour of work putting my phone on do not disturb, and forcing everything distracting out.

While the above tips may not seem immediately helpful, I suggest you try them one at a time. Finding focus can be hard, but I promise it’s doable. And if you’re a serious student or Type-A worker, you know that focus isn’t exactly optional. Sometimes we just have to get the work done, whether we want to or not.

What’s your go to method for finding inspiration?

Truly,

Callie leigh